Infographic
Building Climate-smart Cities
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More than half of humanity lives in urban areas, and cities are responsible for 70% of global greenhouse gas emissions. That presents an exciting opportunity to organisations and nations to make great strides in decarbonisation through smarter cities. By building connected, sustainable, resilient, and livable shared spaces for humanity’s densest populations, we can make real progress to a net zero world. In fact, the United Nations established this mission as their 11th Sustainable Development Goal: making cities more resilient, sustainable, inclusive and safe. Find out how pioneering governments and enterprises, with the help of Wood's digital solutions, are decarbonising cities and paving the way for future sustainability.

eco bus animation
wind turbine animation
wind turbine animation
wind turbine animation
bubbling water from waterfall
floating cloud
moving car
moving recycle van
moving car
spinning sun
picture of a dam
picture of a factory
picture of a solar house
picture of a city
picture of a solar mountain
picture of a crane
picture of a flood
picture of a mobility town
picture of a recycling van
picture of a bus
picture of an electric bus stop
picture of a building
picture of electric cars
picture of a coastal area
picture of a coastal area

SCORE

Wood’s Decarbonisation SCORE
process will take you on the
net zero journey that’s right for your organisation. The process provides a road map to reduce carbon emissions that leverages technology and
alternate solutions that can
transform your business.

ENVision

We combine our own emissions monitoring software, built on Microsoft Azure, with our advisory services to provide real-time insight for effective environmental sustainability management.

Flood Vue

Gain real-time visualisations of
potential flood scenarios through this
AR app that combines multiple data sources to create a clear, immersive picture of severe weather impacts.

Zero-
EmissionSim

This cloud-based simulation toolkit enables cities and transport authorities to unlock the best solution for zero-emissions fleet adoption.

Decision
Vue

Wood's DecisionVue enables smarter,
faster and more robust decision making, harnessing data, analytics and technical insights to deliver better, safer and more resilient outcomes
and solutions.


Resilience Lens

Wood's integrated assessment framework evaluates infrastructure resilience. This enables project owners and investors to explore the potential of the project to withstand sudden shocks and prolonged stresses, while minimizing negative
impacts on the environment
and society.

Water scarcity could displace up to 700 million people by 2030.

Hydrogen creates exciting opportunities because it creates energy without releasing CO2, and can be used in place of fossil fuels to manufacture fertilizer, fuel vehicles, heat homes, and generate electricity.

Waste-to-Energy plants sustainably manage waste, as well as provide electricity and/or co-generated heat, collect scrap metal, and potentially, provide carbon credits for renewable energy.

Living closer together is one of the best ways to mitigate the environmental costs of transportation: Households in areas with more than 10,000 people per square mile consume nearly half the amount of gasoline as households in areas with fewer than 1,000 people per square mile.

More than half of the world’s population lives in cities and most future population growth is predicted to happen in urban areas. Single-family homes require more electricity to heat, cool, and power. New zoning approaches encourage more apartment buildings, which reduce each resident’s carbon footprint.

Reusing contaminated landfills and mines for renewable energy plants, like solar farms, not only reuses the land, but can save millions of dollars in energy costs, create construction jobs, and provide new property tax revenue.

Cement production contributes 8% of the world’s carbon dioxide emissions. But smart cement can actually reduce the material’s net carbon footprint by injecting CO2 into the concrete.

Flooding is the #1 natural disaster threat in the United States and the risk is expected to increase as a result of climate change. A real-time, community-oriented flood warning system based on the regular collection of local rainfall, stream level, and streamflow data can reduce risks involved with flooding.

Parking lots also help control stormwater overflow. As we transition away from the dominance of cars, they can be repurposed to collect stormwater.

Using recycled glass and certain plastics instead of virgin materials can cut energy use and emissions, while reducing environmental impacts by more than 50%. Recycled paper and aluminum reduce environmental impacts between 70-85%.

Redesigning mobility around accessibility means giving priority to sustainable transport modes, such as walking, cycling, public transport and other forms of shared mobility—and even new modes.

Electric buses generate zero emissions, reduce air pollution, and cost less to operate than diesel-powered buses. For example, the e-bus system in Santiago, Chile includes bus stops that use solar panels to. power free Wi-Fi, USB charging and LED lighting. Their e-buses costs 70% less to operate and maintain than diesel-powered buses.

40% of global greenhouse gas emissions are connected to buildings. Farming on rooftops makes better use of space and resources, reducing wasted water, pesticides, and fertilizers, which all drive carbon emissions.

Emissions from transport have grown faster than any other sector over the last 50 years, accounting for approximately 23% of global CO2 emissions. New Mobility-as-a-Service innovations like rideshare services and electric bikes are shifting the transportation industry away from personally-owned vehicles to shared mobility devices delivered as a service—reducing our dependency on gas guzzling cars.

Walk-friendly neighborhoods are not only aesthetically pleasing, but also draw retail, restaurants, and investment. Ultra Low Emission Zones raise revenue that can be reinvested into the city’s public transport system. In London, this policy led to 44,000 fewer polluting vehicles in the city every day and a 44% reduction in roadside nitrogen dioxide in the first 10 months.

Wind energy avoided 198 million metric tons of CO2 emissions in 2019. New advancements in offshore wind farms mitigates any negative impact of the renewable energy on cities.

Seawater desalination not only increases the supply of fresh drinking water, but also presents economic opportunities like commercial salt, metal recovery, and fishing.

In coastal cities, waterfront parks can serve the dual purpose of providing green public space as well as a buffer from stormwater discharges.

More than half of humanity lives in urban areas, and cities are responsible for 70% of global greenhouse gas emissions. That presents an exciting opportunity to organisations and nations to make great strides in decarbonisation through smarter cities. By building connected, sustainable, resilient, and livable shared spaces for humanity’s densest populations, we can make real progress to a net zero world. In fact, the United Nations established this mission as their 11th Sustainable Development Goal: making cities more resilient, sustainable, inclusive and safe. Find out how pioneering governments and enterprises, with the help of Wood's digital solutions, are decarbonising cities and paving the way for future sustainability.


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  • Report

    Welcome to Net Zero

  • Software

    ENVision

  • Case study

    Increasing urban mobility in Ontario through transit network expansion

  • Case study

    Humber Zero project

Prabu Parthasarathy
Vice President of Applied Intelligence
Matt Kirk
Senior Vice PresidentEOI - Specialist Engineering & Consulting (EOI)
Naem Farooqi
Director of Sustainable Transportation and Asset Management