On 27 and 28 April, over 50 riders and 14 volunteers from Wood put pedal to the metal for a great cause by participating in the BP MS 150, a two-day, 150-mile fundraising bike ride from Houston to Austin, Texas.

Team Wood’s dedication to the BP MS 150 started long before the official ride, as the cyclists put in hours and hours of training and fundraising throughout the year. The team raised over $75,000 with funds still being added through shirt sales and a recent bowling tournament.

With 9,000 cyclists, 3,500 volunteers, and countless spectators along the 150-mile route between Houston and Austin, the BP MS 150 ride is the largest fund-raising event for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. The event aims to raise $13.5 million for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society in order to help researchers and support the 2.3 million people living with multiple sclerosis (MS).

This year, unlike many other years, the team was blessed with a spectacular weekend – blue skies, light breeze and glorious sunshine.  Cyclists began the ride at the Horseshoe building on the Wood Houston campus, to spend the night in a tent at the midpoint of La Grange, Texas, before heading out for the remaining miles in the morning, and the hilliest portion of the ride, into Austin.

“It’s great to see companies and people from all types of organizations and walks of life coming together for a wonderful cause,” said Andrew Stewart, Asset Solutions Americas CEO and fourth-year BP MS 150 rider. “It’s a beautiful, if grueling ride, that brings out the best in people, from the cyclists to the volunteers, to the sponsors and supporters. The best part of the weekend is the time spent with colleagues and friends, and most importantly, it is the way we all unite to help those living with MS.”

Adriana Perez, Team Wood 2019 co-captain, knew it would be hard work and a lot of effort, but she was up for the challenge. “The most memorable part of this year’s ride for me was having some riders join in on the second day, and the bus ride back to Houston, where 30 riders rode back together, learned more about their teammates and talked about their experience,” Adriana said. “Many people are affected by or have lost someone due to MS; the main goal for all is to bring awareness and funds to help.”

Multiple sclerosis is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million worldwide.

The National MS Society mobilizes people and resources to support those affected by MS. Last year, the Society invested $40 million in MS research with more than 360 active projects around the world. Through its comprehensive nationwide network of services, the Society devoted $100 million to help more than 1 million people affected by MS.  To learn more, click here.